Alexandre Cabanel - The Birth of Venus - 1863
"This Venus hovers somewhere between an ancient deity and a modern dream; the ambiguity of her eyes, that seem to be closed but that at a close look reveals that she is awake… a nude who could be asleep or awake is specially formidable for a male viewer." - Robert Rosenblum, art historian and curator

Alexandre Cabanel - The Birth of Venus - 1863

"This Venus hovers somewhere between an ancient deity and a modern dream; the ambiguity of her eyes, that seem to be closed but that at a close look reveals that she is awake… a nude who could be asleep or awake is specially formidable for a male viewer." - Robert Rosenblum, art historian and curator

Alexandre Cabanel - Self Portrait - 1852
French painter, known very well for his fine portraiture and academic style.First exhibited at the Paris Salon at the age of 19.Napoleon III’s preferred painter - Napoleon III actually ended up purchasing Cabanel’s most famous piece, The Birth of Venus. 

Alexandre Cabanel - Self Portrait - 1852

French painter, known very well for his fine portraiture and academic style.
First exhibited at the Paris Salon at the age of 19.
Napoleon III’s preferred painter - Napoleon III actually ended up purchasing Cabanel’s most famous piece, The Birth of Venus. 

Dream of Spring by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1901

Dream of Spring by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1901

Self-portrait in a Straw Hat by Elisabeth-Louise Vigée-Lebru, 1782.
Vigée-Lebru is recognized as the most famous woman painter of the eighteenth century, and was a part of the Rococco and Neoclassical movements. She worked as Marie Antoinette’s portraitist for six years.
The National Gallery, London

Self-portrait in a Straw Hat by Elisabeth-Louise Vigée-Lebru, 1782.

Vigée-Lebru is recognized as the most famous woman painter of the eighteenth century, and was a part of the Rococco and Neoclassical movements. She worked as Marie Antoinette’s portraitist for six years.

The National Gallery, London

Boy with a Top by Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, 1735
In 1757, Chardin was granted a studio and living quarters in the Louvre by Louis XV.

Boy with a Top by Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin, 1735

In 1757, Chardin was granted a studio and living quarters in the Louvre by Louis XV.

After the Bath by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1875.

After the Bath by William-Adolphe Bouguereau, 1875.

The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, 1767-1768.
Oil on canvas.

The Swing by Jean-Honoré Fragonard, 1767-1768.

Oil on canvas.

Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix, 1830
Probably Delacroix’s best known painting, it is an unforgettable image of Parisians, having taken up arms, marching forward under the banner of the tricolor representing liberty, equality, and fraternity. The French government bought the painting but officials deemed its glorification of liberty too inflammatory and removed it from public view. Nonetheless, Delacroix still received many government commissions for murals and ceiling paintings. At the end of the reign of King Louis Philippe, Delacroix’ painting was finally put on display by the newly elected President, Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III.)
The boy holding a gun up on the right is sometimes thought to be an inspiration of the character Gavroche in Victor Hugo’s 1862 novel, Les Misérables.
Oil on canvas; resides in the Musée du Louvre.

Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix, 1830

Probably Delacroix’s best known painting, it is an unforgettable image of Parisians, having taken up arms, marching forward under the banner of the tricolor representing liberty, equality, and fraternity. The French government bought the painting but officials deemed its glorification of liberty too inflammatory and removed it from public view. Nonetheless, Delacroix still received many government commissions for murals and ceiling paintings. At the end of the reign of King Louis Philippe, Delacroix’ painting was finally put on display by the newly elected President, Louis Napoleon (Napoleon III.)

The boy holding a gun up on the right is sometimes thought to be an inspiration of the character Gavroche in Victor Hugo’s 1862 novel, Les Misérables.

Oil on canvas; resides in the Musée du Louvre.